747 Data

The following graphic reveals how much data is available to computers on a commercial 747.

A display of all recorded flight senors on this 747.

A display of all recorded flight senors on this 747.

This chart reveals nearly two minutes of flight data.  It begins at the left, at 20:18:40 (40 seconds after 8:18PM).  It continues on to the right, at 20:20:20 (20 seconds past 8:20PM).

As a narrative in the experience of a passenger:

  • the 747 is sitting at the end of the runway for the first 10 seconds.
  • the 747 has all four throttles full on at 10 seconds in.  Maximum thrust is achieved at 10 to 15 seconds later where all four engine lines level off (lines marked EPR for Engine Pressure Ratio).
  • Longitudinal Acceleration (the pressure you feel pushing you into the seat back at take-off) also tracks up through this same 10 to 15 seconds.
    For the nearly two minutes, it varies between 0.20 and 0.25 G.  A 150 pound individual would feel at least 30 pounds of pressure pushing them into the seat back.
  • Vertical Acceleration (the pressure you feel pushing you into the seat pan).  There is none until lift-off which occurs at 20:19:40.  At that time, you feel 0.15 G of force pushing you into your seat with 16 or more pounds of pressure.  There is also a corresponding increase of pressure against the seat back.

These are all familiar to the traveler.  Other data may be compared to discover all other activities going on during flight, like the pilot pressing the microphone transmit key at the top of the graphic.

One major point of interest.  There is a lot of noise in some of the data.  Some of it is genuine representations of what is going on.  Other data is corrupted.

 

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